Legal Cannabis Is Stimulating the Economy

economy stimulating cannabis money

It’s no surprise that cannabis is a successful business. It may, however, be a shock to learn that in Oregon alone the recreational cannabis industry brought in $1.2 billion in 2016 alone. To say that cannabis is a booming economic industry is saying it lightly.

“Cannabis is a job-creation machine,” Oregon economist Beau Whitney told Marijuana.com. “On a national basis, the $50 billion cannabis market is essentially the equivalent to the U.S. wine market ($55 billion).” In fact, over 900 businesses were licensed in Oregon in the last year, and 1,225 applicants wait approval. That’s 2,142 recreational cannabis businesses in Oregon alone.

Similarly, in Washington there are over 735 recreationally licensed marijuana businesses operating in the state of Washington, including Mary Jane’s House of Grass. That compares to 559 Starbucks locations statewide. Of the licensed businesses, 58% are processors and producers, while 23% are retail locations. And, with so many retail locations, 90% of the population lives within ten miles of a cannabis store. However, between strict location laws and residential approval, it is a challenge for a store to begin operation. This ongoing discussion helps keep cannabis approval ratings high.

In addition to monetary value, cannabis is also adding to the job sector as around 300,000 jobs in the U.S. are currently related to this industry, with the ability to rise to more than one million as states legalize consumption, according to Whitney. This is a drastic boom comparatively to education where 105,000 jobs were created last year and construction, where 219,000 were adding, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor and Statistics.

And, cannabis is sure to grow in some of the fastest growing cities where the housing market is booming, like Portland and Vancouver. In Vancouver, the price per square foot rose over 11% to $185 and the average price for a home was up to $297,000, according to Trulia. Similarly in Portland, Oregon, where there is a surplus of buyers and a deficit of sellers, the prices of homes continues to increase.

“Inventory in the ballpark of $300,000 is rapidly disappearing as prices far outpace wages, a scenario exacerbated by the continuing fallout of a homebuilding draught,” as stated in an article on Oregonlive.com, as well as “the region’s surging population and the tendency of current homeowners to stay put instead of move up.”

In addition to creating jobs and putting money back into the economy, cannabis funds are contributing positively to the community. According to an article in thenewstribune.com, in the next two years, Washington anticipates raking in $730 million. And, 60% is slated to go toward public health programs, including Medicaid, substance abuse prevention efforts, and health centers. However, some Washington lawmakers, including Senator Ann Rivers, would like some of the funds go toward elementary schools, whose budget continues to drop.

While other politicians, like House Majority Leader Pat Sullivan, thinks the money should go to healthcare as stated in Initiative 502 that legalized recreational marijuana in Washington, this is a good problem to have.

“We can’t ignore public health or access to health care,” said Sullivan, “The initiative that passed dedicated that money to those causes.” However, with marijuana expected to rise $75 million between the state’s next two budget cycles, maybe the law should expand to fund even more public resources provided by the State of Washington.

“Marijuana isn’t our solution to education funding,” said Senator John Braun. “It helps us build a stable and balanced budget, but it’s not a panacea that fixes all our problems,” he added.

 

And, these positive results continue to benefits future states looking to add legalization bills and will eventually help to convince the federal government to remove cannabis from the Controlled Substance list and officially back states that enable pro cannabis laws.

In addition to monetary figures, it was found that in 2015 – the most recent data available – that over 29 million grams of cannabis were produced in the State of Washington. This is equal to allowing all residents, regardless of age, to receive four grams. And production is only expected to rise.

As loose cannabis sales continue to rise, so do edibles. In 2015, over 731,000 units of edibles were sold and the data continue to show a rise each month since legalization. The top cannabis-infused product has been baked goods like cookies and brownies at 35%, following by general desserts like chocolate, caramels, and brittle at 33%.

 

Since legalization, Colorado has discovered that cannabis is a stronger economic driver than 90% if its industries. This, we’re learning, is similar in other locations where recreational legalization has come to pass. In fact, it was this realization that spurred passage in places including Washington and Oregon.

Today, cannabis is a numbers game. As medical research continues to discover the many benefits associated with cannabis – improved mood and sleep; decreased pain, anxiety, depression – and it continues to add jobs and funds in states where medical and recreational cannabis is legal, it’s become a game-changer.

Ultimately, the future of cannabis is shifting. Visiting a marijuana dispensary in Vancouver is becoming more normalized and it’s contributing to the economy in ways so dramatic they were unforeseeable. The vast sales show how acceptable cannabis is becoming and at Mary Jane’s House of Grass, your marijuana dispensary in Vancouver, we couldn’t be more delighted.

We’ve seen first hand and heard through our customers the wonderful benefits cannabis has contributed to their lives. We recognize the high demand for quality products our customers expect and receive from us. We know there is a growing future for this industry and we can’t wait to see where it takes us next.

There is a marijuana dispensary in Vancouver on every other corner, but with high demand and room for more, we’re glad to be apart of your community and can’t wait until you visit again.

Recipe: Easy Infused Kickin’ Chicken

grilled infused cannabis chicken

Sometimes cooking with cannabis can be complicated, from infusing your own butter or oils, to using the whole plant. That’s why we love using products like Verdita Dragon infused syrup by Craft Elixirs. The dosing is already done for you, so you have total control of your experience. This recipe makes it outrageously easy.

Unlike trying to infuse butter or oil to cook with and not really knowing what the dose is afterward, these syrups are measured out for you already, making recipes a piece of cake. The syrup we are using for this recipe comes in a 100mg bottle that can be easily dosed to your preference.

For this simple recipe, we used a jalapeno and cannabis infused syrup to add the kick to our kickin’ chicken.

spicy cannabis infused syrup

Ingredients

4-6 thin cut chicken breasts

1/2 C extra virgin olive oil

Juice of 1 lime

salt

pepper

red pepper flakes

Verdita Dragon infused syrup by Craft Elixirs, dosed to your liking

Step 1: If the chicken breasts are not already sliced thin, place them on a cutting board and slice them horizontally through the middle with a sharp knife. Salt and pepper both sides of each piece of chicken.

Step 2: Add oil, lime juice, pepper flakes, and 40-100mg dose of Verdita Dragon cannabis syrup, depending on your desired dose per piece of chicken, to a plastic resealable bag. Shake to mix.

Step 3: Put seasoned chicken into the bag with the oil mixture and shake to coat chicken. Let sit for at least one hour, or for better infusion and flavor, overnight in the refrigerator.

Step 4: Grill chicken over medium heat, basting occasionally with the remaining sauce, and serve hot.

Serving suggestions: Serve with a slice of lime to juice over the top. Top with jalapeno slices or a spicy chimichurri to give it even more kick. Or top with a pineapple mango chutney to cut the heat.

 

A Brief History of Cannabis

cannabis, plant, leaf

By now, nearly all stoners are aware of the differences between indica, sativa,and hybrid cannabis varieties. These familiar names bring to mind our favorite strains, Blueberry, Green Crack, Dutch Treat, the list goes on, and continues to grow as people continue to cross-breed. With so many varieties, many bearing multiple names and phenotypes, choosing the right strain for you can be quite the difficult proposition. In order for one to best navigate these winding, murky waters, one must first be willing to learn a little about the origins and biology of this remarkable herb.

Cannabis evolved between 34 million years ago and 6.38 million years ago in the Kush mountain range, which extends from North-eastern Afghanistan all the way down through Northern Pakistan, and India’s northern border, forming the western portion of the Hindu Kush Himalayan Region. Seeds found in sites dated to be as old as 12,000 years suggest that our ancient hunter-gatherer ancestors were at least partly responsible for spreading cannabis from this fairly central region to Africa and Asia as they migrated between these areas. As humanity settled into it’s various different corners of the globe, the cannabis that they had collected and taken with them began to adapt to the various different climates in which it was dropped along the way. It was in this way that C. sativa and C. indica separated and became distinct species which began self-sustaining wild populations.

As cannabis adapted to different areas, it began to differ greatly from its geographically distant relatives, both physiologically and in the terpenes and cannabinoids that they produced. Cannabis which stayed in the mountainous Kush region became known as indica and grew to be short and stocky, producing dense buds. These adaptations protect against the cold, wet, mountain climate which can cause rot in less adapted plants. Meanwhile cannabis which landed in the hot, low-elevation African and Asian climates grew tall with a loose, fluffy bud structure, allowing them to grow and reproduce very quickly and became known as sativas. Sativa varieties even made it over to the new world by way of the Spanish Invasion of South America.These different regional varieties are what became known as the “Landrace Strains”, and these are considered to be the genetic forebears of all the strains that we know today.

A landrace strain can best be described as cannabis that has come from a specific region which has not been crossbred with any other strain, and are considered to be genetically “pure” sativa or indica cultivars. Strains like Hindu Kush, Moroccan red, Durban Poison, and Acapulco Gold are all examples of landrace strains, illustrating just how far this plant has spread and how adaptable it is. Perhaps the most fascinating thing about these strains is how different locations and growing conditions can affect such drastic differences in taste, smell, and effect. Differences which came fully to light in the early 1960’s, when strains from Afghanistan, India, and Pakistan were brought to Northern California by adventurous stoners who had hiked the fabled “Hippie Highway” and returned with seeds. Conditions are very similar in the two regions, both being mountainous terrain on roughly the same parallel, allowing for these strains to adapt quickly, producing new phenotypes in the process.

As growers came across all these different strains, the first intentional crosses between the two subspecies began to spring up all over California and the West coast. Strains that are now world famous such as Skunk, Big Bud, Haze, Northern Lights, and many others made their debut between 1960 and the mid 1980s in a frenzy of crossbreeding. Even the U.S. Government got in on the action, breeding the strain G-13 at the University of Mississippi in an effort to understand more about the plant. One night somebody stole the seeds to the strain and soon enough, people were smoking government weed. Strains developed during this time are referred to as heirloom strains and they are still highly prized for their unique flavors and highs. Eventually, the cross-breeding fever spread overseas to the Netherlands, where legal tolerance allowed for a more scientific approach to breeding. Dutch breeders went figuratively nuts, producing a litany of new hybrids like Dutch Treat, and Cherry Pie. In fact, many of the hybrid strains that we know now were produced by dutch growers during this time.

In this day and age, there are so many variants, it’s nearly impossible to keep them all straight. With genetic lines ranging from 95% pure indica or sativa, to lineages which have been scrambled to the dank smelling winds, finding the perfect strain can be difficult. Additionally, strains which were at one time staples of the cannabis world have become difficult, some even say impossible, to come across. An industry wide lack of desire to cultivate the old strains, combined with the danger of transporting landraces from their native homes are definitely not helping in regards to reviving these older strains. All’s not lost however, as a large number of growers have been dedicating resources towards reviving the old landraces and heirlooms.

As humans continue to grow and change as a species, so to does our oldest friend. Cannabis is as versatile and ever changing as the people who grow and smoke it, leading to a symbiosis that has stood the test of time. We must be cautious however, if we lose touch with the origins of cannabis we run the risk of losing strains and their unique effects. Understanding where our favorite strains come from and how they grow is important to maintaining the genetic integrity and quality of smoke from our favorite strains for years to come. Hopefully, with the proper care and attention, we can continue to innovate without losing touch with our roots.

 

  • by Budtender Andrew

Cannabis; The Superfood

cannabis superfood

Many of you may already be familiar with the cannabis plant, it goes by many names, Mary Jane, Reefer, Chronic, Ganja, and Herb. You’re also most likely already familiar with smoking out of bongs on your couch at home and passing joints with friends, or maybe even eating too many brownies at a party. However, have you ever considered having a freshly chopped Marijuana leaf salad?

The marijuana plant itself contains over 400 various and unique chemical compounds, these chemical compounds are what makes Marijuana a superfood. Recent research on cannabis from medical professionals such as Dr. William L. Courtney (who began with a Bachelor of Science in Microbiology, University of Michigan) has led to the discovery that cannabis is in fact, a superfood! Medical cannabis professionals, including Dr. William L. Courtney, even suggest that raw cannabis consumption should be a vital part of everyone’s day-to-day diet. On that note, people suffering from chronic illness could benefit greatly from the daily consumption of raw cannabis.

Like most dark leafy greens, the leaves of the Marijuana plant (as well as its flowers/” buds”) contain important nutrients such as fiber, protein and essential vitamins. Some of these nutrients include; Folate (which is essential for DNA repair) Iron, Calcium, Vitamin C, and Vitamin K. just to name a few! Cannabis is also packed full of antioxidants and in certain strains, the flavonoid compound anthocyanins. Anthocyanins are responsible for the dark purple color that is found in Cannabis Indica plants (like Granddaddy Purple). It is also found in common foods like blackberries, plums, eggplant, red onions and even red raspberries. These anthocyanins counteract the imbalance of oxidative and antioxidative factors in our bodies, therefore defending our health. Not to mention, cannabis contains an abundance of Omega 3 & 6 fatty acids, as well as terpenes and essential amino acids. On top of all of that, what makes cannabis (including Hemp) exclusive to other leafy greens, is all the cannabinoids that it contains. When consuming cannabis in this raw manner, it’s considered to be a vegetable!

Incorporating fresh cannabis into one’s daily diet is extremely nutritional in many ways, that’s for sure! Nevertheless, there is one stipulation that makes consuming raw cannabis rather difficult to achieve in our society now. This being, you can’t simply add any dried and cured cannabis to a blender and expect to receive these benefits. You must consume the fresh plant, like you would with spinach/other leafy greens from either the grocery store. Now, this would be simple, if growing your own cannabis was legal… unfortunately this is still not the case in most of the United States. Even in the states where it is legal, there are licenses and medical requirements that make it impossible for the common person to grow. If we had the ability to buy bagged, fresh cannabis, our diets would be greatly enhanced! Yet, we still must take growing methods into consideration. Consuming food sprayed with harmful pesticides whether it be cannabis or any other vegetable, is an immense health risk. As we know, it’s rather difficult and often expensive to find organic, non-genetically modified vegetables on the market. Therefore, home growing would be an advantageous option for many, if it were legal! Hopefully as knowledge about cannabis spreads, we will see some acceptance towards the home gardening of this plant.

Now, the question you’ve probably been asking yourself this whole time is, “…but will it get me high?”. Here’s the situation: Cannabis when consumed fresh, usually has a higher concentration of THCA (tetrahydrocannabinol-acid) as opposed to THC. THCA itself does not produce a psychoactive high when consumed. THCA must first be converted into THC, which can be done simply by applying heat! Some of the conversion also happens in the drying/curing stage of marijuana, which is another reason why eating the plant fresh is recommended for the strongest nutritional benefit. This is good news to those who would like to avoid the psychoactive effects of THC but still enjoy the anti-inflammatory properties of THCA along with all the nutritional benefits of eating a superfood. So, in short, you’d have to eat a heck of a lot of raw cannabis to feel any sort of high from it and even then, you’re better off just smoking it instead for recreational purposes.

All told, the cannabis plant is beneficial to our health in many ways, one of those ways being that it can be consumed like a vegetable. With all those vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants, cannabis makes the perfect addition to any recipe! Unfortunately eating raw cannabis in this day’s society might be rather difficult to achieve, however hopefully that will change soon. If you’d like to experience the nutritional and non-psychoactive benefit of cannabis in your diet, and you can get your hands on some fresh leaves yourself, here are a few ideas for you! You could either straight up use the leaves whole, mixed with other greens such as spinach, kale and arugula and mix yourself your favorite salad. You could also grind or chop up the leaves and sprinkle them into a finished pesto sauce or maybe over a finished tomato soup. You can even make raw cannabis smoothie to start your morning right! Keep in mind, when storing raw cannabis, you should store it in the fridge, like you would other fresh leafy greens. Here’s a recipe to keep in the cookbook for when the opportunity arises to consume some raw cannabis.

  • By Budtender Autumn

cannabis banana blueberry smoothie recipe

Blueberry Banana and Raw Cannabis Smoothie

  • 1 Banana
  • 3 (Large) Strawberries
  • 1 Cup Blueberries
  • ½ Cup Coconut Milk
  • ½ Cup Almond Milk
  • 1tsb Chia Seeds (if you like the texture)
  • 1tsb Hemp Seeds
  • 1tsb Flax Seeds
  • 15 Fresh Cannabis Leaves and 2-4 grams of Raw Cannabis Buds (if available)

 

What You Need to Know About Senate Bill “Path to Marijuana Reform”

Senate Bill path to Marijuana reform

If you are a cannabis connoisseur who regularly visits our Mary Jane’s House of Grass dispensary, then you’ve probably heard about the newest pro cannabis bill that was introduced to the Senate on March 30. But, whether you’re hearing about “Path to Marijuana Reform” for the first time, or you just really want it to pass, here’s what you need to know.

Today, already 95% of Americans have some form of access to legal marijuana and more than 20% live in states that legally allow adults to consume cannabis. This group of three bills, introduced by Oregon politicians Senator Ron Wyden and Congressman Earl Blumenauer, aims to grant legal access to all Americans in cannabis approved states, introduce responsible federal regulation, and legitimize and protect marijuana businesses throughout the U.S.

Unfortunately, since cannabis is illegal under federal laws, consumers in compliance with legal state laws can still be arrested and charged with a federal crime; they can even face jail time.

Similarly, cannabis retailers, researchers, healthcare providers, producers, and more, who are adhering to their local state laws may face jail time, financial penalties, and asset forfeiture. Additionally, they also have a more difficult time (than federally approved businesses) receiving bank loans, accessing bank accounts, renting property, conducting scientific testing, and the challenges don’t stop there.

In spite of these current provocations, the cannabis industry is on the rise. It’s expected to provide 300,000 jobs by 2020 and grow to a $24 billion business by 2025, far surpassing 2016 totals of $7.2 billion. This, coupled with the dramatic benefits of cannabis and low-risks, especially when compared to substances like alcohol, is the driving force for the reformation.

So, here’s what’s currently included in the plan. The “Path to Marijuana Reform”, as outlined by Wyden and Blumenauer, is comprised of three separate bills introduced as a package. This is what they entail:

Small Business Tax Equity Act

This bill is focused to benefit the small businesses, like your local Mary Jane’s House of Grass dispensary. It would repeal the current tax penalties aimed directly at state-legal businesses that are forced to operate against direct approval by the federal government. It will also allow these owners to claim deductions and tax credits that are afforded to all other small businesses.

Responsibility Addressing the Marijuana Policy Gap Act

For consumers and businesses alike, this potential law would remove any federal criminal penalties, including jail time, legally upholding the rights of citizens adhering to their respective state cannabis laws.

It would also remove current barriers faced by cannabis business owners. Under this law, they could just as easily open a bank account and secure advertising as any other legal business.

Additionally, it would ensure that those who consume marijuana are granted the same access to federal programs such as federal housing and student loans. It would also not deport or deny U.S. entry to legal immigrants who are found to consume cannabis and are complying with their state laws.

This potential law would also remove the burden of veterans legally acquiring medical marijuana in states where it is legal, and would similarly protect pro cannabis Native American tribes under both state and federal law.

Marijuana Revenue and Regulation Act

This particular bill is focused on federal regulation. According to the proposal, “It would impose an excise tax on marijuana products similar to current federal excise taxes on alcohol and tobacco.” The rate would top out at 25% of the sale.

Additionally, it would be required for producers, importers, and wholesalers to receive permits from the Department of Treasury, similar to the permits required by each state.

As suspected, the bill suggests regulating marijuana in a similar manner to alcohol, which is already common practice (if not stricter) in states where medicinal and recreational marijuana is already legalized.

While the bill would federally uphold state rulings in regards to marijuana, at this time it would not ensure legalization across the U.S. as marijuana is regulated very differently across state lines. More specifically, it would still prohibit the sale or distribution in states where it’s illegal under their current law.

Support Behind the Bill

While states are beginning to legalize marijuana in various capacities, Oregon in particular wants to protect its growing industry and all parties involved, which, said Wyden, was why he presented the reform.

“This three-step approach will spur job growth and boost our economy all while ensuring the industry is being held to a fair standard,” said Wyden in a press release.

“As more states follow Oregon’s leadership in legalization and regulating marijuana,” added Blumenauer, “too many people are trapped between federal and state laws. It’s not right, and it’s not fair. We need to change now – and this bill is the way to do it.”

It should be no surprise that Blumenauer is one of four founding members of the Congressional Cannabis Caucus introduced February 2017. He was joined by Republican congressmen Dana Rohrabacher of California and Don Young of Alaska, as well as Democrat U.S. Representative Jared Polis of Colorado.

Polis has also been pushing for marijuana reform. He introduced a bill in 2015 that was the basis for the “Path to Marijuana Reform” and also introduced a watered-down bill in March 2017 that would remove marijuana from the Controlled Substances Act and regulate it like alcohol. And, he’s not the only one. U.S. Representatives Tom Garrett, a Virginia Republican, and Tulsi Gabbard, a Hawaiian Democrat, also submitted legislation this year. “Ending Marijuana Prohibition Act of 2017” also requests to remove marijuana from the Controlled Substance Act, placing the authority in state hands.

While proposal bills are nothing new, increased bipartisan support for the federal government to place marijuana regulation in state control is gaining overwhelming support. Ultimately, federal approval will ensure safe regulation and consumption by those living in pro cannabis states. And this is good for everyone involved.

Oregon is Proposing Cannabis Pesticide Changes

Oregon cannabis pesticide laws

All agricultural products are closely regulated no matter where you visit in the U.S. This is to ensure you consume fruits and vegetables that are grown with care and are safe to consume. For this reason, pesticide use is strictly controlled.

Similarly, pesticide use on cannabis is strictly controlled. You don’t want to inhale a joint or eat an edible that was sprayed with potentially harmful chemicals just like you don’t want to eat a tomato that was coated in those same pesticides. Ideally, everything you consume should safe, including your cannabis.

That’s why your Vancouver, Washington dispensary, including us at Mary Jane’s House of Grass, develops close relationships with its distributors. Not only do we want to guarantee you with the best cannabis that provides the high you are looking for, we want to assure our customers that no matter what they purchase, it was grown with care.

While we have established diligent standards on our own, states including Washington, California, and Oregon have also introduced laws to mitigate any harmful reactions and regulate cannabis through testing to confirm its safe for consumption.

However, just as all industries evolve, so does the cannabis industry, which is why Oregon is rethinking its current pesticide laws.

Just like tomatoes, the Oregon Department of Agriculture lists cannabis as an agricultural crop in terms of pesticide regulation, so the guidelines are similar, but evolving. With that in mind, the most recent iteration of approved pesticides was updated on April 26, 2017. While the list is not a recommendation or endorsement, it does distinguish between prohibited and condoned pesticides.

In addition to the changing pesticide list, the Oregon Health Authority (OHA) is also considering revisions to the cannabis testing rules. While some believe the change is spurred by high testing prices and long waits for results, it seems that high contamination is the main culprit advancing change, according to an article in the Oregon Cannabis Connection.

As it turns out, 10% of flower and upwards of 26% of cannabis concentrates fail the pesticide contamination test in Oregon, according to the OHA. However, failure rates were even higher in most labs when it comes to concentrates. The estimates are closer to 50 to 70%, but could have been considered preliminary tests and were therefore never reported to OHA.

It seems imprudent to limit testing, but more testing leads to more expenses for the consumer and, by law, the state is mandated to consider both consumer cost and public safety when installing rules. With that in mind, Andre Ourso, manager of the Oregon Medical Marijuana Program added, “The agency will evaluate the public comment. If it comes out that this is not something the public wants, the agency won’t adopt the change.”

Unfortunately, it seems as if this new introduction for limited pesticide testing was a surprise to many when it was announced by OHA and OLCC on March 3.

According to a Rules Advisory Committee member, and head chemist at OG Analytics, Rodger Voelker, the pesticide changes were a surprise introduction. “We thought we were going to be talking about some of the problems concerning edibles and batch sizes and addressing a wider scope of issues,” he said.

The concern does not stop with him; during the testimony other state representatives discussed their concerns with limiting testing as well including Representative Carl Wilson who said, “I guess a question that I would have is: given the responsibility that we have here, how do we vouch for walking back on safety standards.”

And Representative Julie Fahey asked, “Right now there is a relatively high percentage of concentrates and extracts that are failing and yet we seem to have set up what seems to be a ‘safe harbor’ where if your usable marijuana is tested to use concentrates, we are rolling back the requirements therein allowing this random sampling.

However, others were more moderate, like Senior Policy Advisor for the Governor Jeff Rhoades. “We are still testing more than any other food safety arena and we want to maintain that level of public safely, that an important piece for us,” he said. “ But we also want to be mindful of our statutory obligations to make certain that we are not making this overly burdensome or that we’re costing Oregonians good jobs, as well.”

It’s definitely a topic with no clear answer, but change is coming either way. While the public comment period, which was between March 15 and April 30, has now ended, whatever new rules come into place will be implemented by the Oregon Liquor Control Commission by June 1, 2017.

Today, in Oregon, testing is around $350 to $400 at most labs, which includes all the required tests to-date. This is way up from previous rates due to the stringent ongoing standard changes, but, says the labs, is not a result of “price collusion”. In fact, it’s frustrating to lab owners, who are faced with backlash for rising costs, said Camille Holladay, owner of Synergistic Pesticide Lab in Portland.

“Beyond the standard costs of rent, insurance, labor, utilities, marketing that most businesses have, there are instrumentation/equipment purchase and ongoing costs, specialized labor costs, accreditation related costs, calibrations, consumables, solvents, chemicals, gases, hazardous waste costs – I could go on.”

While something needs to change to ensure fair pricing and improved safety, one thing is for sure: education on pesticide use is needed. Among the cannabis crops that failed, some failure was seen among allowable pesticides. This shows that approved cannabis pesticides are being used improperly. For this reason, Holladay is proposing an education campaign this spring to ensure growers know how to properly read pesticide labels and follow the directions as specified.

While this has been a hot topic in Oregon, it’s not distinctive to this state. Similar conversations are taking place in other states where cannabis is now legal. The industry is new and evolving and our Vancouver, Washington dispensary is rolling with the punches.

Regardless of the changes to come, we will continue to ensure, regardless of state regulations that when you purchase cannabis and its concentrates at Mary Jane’s House of Grass you are receiving the highest quality products.

Bong Bowls, What’s the Difference?

bong, glass, how to, shop, cannabis, vancouver

Bong Bowls: Rubber Grommet vs. Glass-on-Glass

There was a day when most people didn’t care about what type of bong bowl they had. But the days of the cannabis connoisseur are upon us. Consumers are becoming picky, and we at Mary Jane’s House of Grass believe that to be a good thing! We want you to be picky, because that means you’re getting the best, safest, and most effective cannabis experience possible. After all, cannabis is all about enjoying life and having a good time!

So what are the two categories of bong bowls? What are the differences between the two? And most importantly, why does it matter to you as the consumer?

The Two Types

The two main categories in bong bowls are rubber grommet (also called slide bowls) and glass-on-glass. Rubber grommets are exactly like they sound. They’ll usually have an o-ring around the base of the bowl, which fits into the down stem to form a seal between the bowl and the bong itself. A glass-on-glass bowl will have a frosted glass “joint” that fits snugly into the down stem, without the need for an o-ring or other seal. It’s just the glass of the bowl joining to the glass of the bong.

These two types are both effective in creating a seal between the bowl and the bong. However, they each have their own benefits and detriments. So let’s examine the differences, and determine which type would be the best fit for you!

Rubber Grommet

Rubber grommet bowls, also called slide bowls, are generally going to be less expensive than glass-on-glass. This is because they tend to be thinner, and they do not need to be exactly the right size, since their seal comes from the rubber grommet or o-ring. Using this type of bowl is makes it easier to slide out of the down stem, making for a quicker, easier clearing of the smoke from the chamber. Whereas a glass-on-glass bowl will use friction to keep it sealed and secure, a rubber grommet bowl does not create any friction. It just “slides”.

There are definite downsides to grommet bowls. In fact, for most connoisseurs, the downsides will outweigh the upsides. Most importantly, because there is no friction locking the bowl down in place, a fair amount of airflow gets through, which means your hits will not be as efficient or strong. It also means the bowl can fall out much easier. If you’re like us, you’ve had the occasional “butt bump” of the bong, and sent the bowl crashing to the ground, stamping your ticket back to Mary Jane’s for a new one. Second, grommet bongs are usually more difficult to clean. The reason is that the down stem is attached via the grommet. Many people struggle to take it out, and even end up breaking their bong in the process, sometimes causing injury from broken glass. Not fun when you’re trying to get high!

Glass-On-Glass

Glass-on-glass bowls are the more popular choice for the cannabis connoisseur, because they form a nearly perfect seal at the joint. Whereas grommets simply sit on top of their joint, glass-on-glass bowl joints “hug” each other, forming a seal from friction. This means that the bong will be airtight in all the right places, making it easier and much more efficient to take a hit. The friction seal also makes it much harder for the bowl to slip out accidentally.

Another nice thing about glass-on-glass bowls is that they are a more ubiquitous option on the cannabis market. They are very common, and come in standard sizes of 10mm, 14mm, and 19mm. You should be able to walk into any headshop on the planet and find dozens of options for each size. And the best part is that you’ll usually find the more extravagant, beautiful designs for glass-on-glass bowls. This is for two reasons which we’ve already mentioned. 1) Glass blowers want their product to be effective and efficient as well as beautiful, and 2) Glass blowers don’t want their bowls to easily fall out of their bong (think of how hard they worked on that piece!!!).

The biggest downside to a glass-on-glass bowl is, ironically, one of its biggest upsides. The fact that the joint creates a tight seal based on friction also means that it’s not as easily maneuverable, and can get stuck when you’re trying to pull it out. It can create a tug-o-war match with your bong, and end in you ripping the bowl out and sending your weed flying across the room!

The Verdict

There’s no perfect answer for which type of bowl to buy. Many times, it will depend on which bong you already own, or which bong catches your eye in the store. However, we recommend that you take the type of bowl into account when looking for a bong, and consider these pros and cons, and decide which one will work best for you. Most importantly, when you don’t know the answer, ask your friendly budtenders at Mary Jane’s House of Grass! We’re always looking to help. It’s what makes us smile! At the end of the day, though, we want you to walk out with something that makes you happy.

It’s your world. We’re just living in it!

-Budtender Matt

Is Cannabis Safe for Pets?

cannabis use safe for pets

We are big fans of pets over here at our House of Grass dispensary in Vancouver, WA. At Mary Jane’s we believe cannabis is for all, not just for all people but also for our beloved four-legged friends. Not only has cannabis become something with known benefits that we enjoy partaking in recreationally and medicinally, as well as recommending our favorite strains to everyone we know, it is also continually being used in new and unexpected ways.

 

More frequently customers, and even friends and family, are coming to us and asking, “Is cannabis safe for my pet?”

While you might conjure images of your higher-than-a-kite friend taking a huge hit and then blowing in into their dog’s face to see what would happen, this has become a more legitimate and complicated question. People aren’t exactly wondering what will happen if their pet gets high, they are looking for real solutions to help their pooch.

What they really want to know is, will cannabis relieve:

  •      My dog’s anxiety? He freaks out every time I leave the house.
  •      The immense pain my cat is experiencing as she battles arthritis.
  •      The same cancer symptoms we experience as humans faced by our favorite furry friends?

Today, more and more often, people are asking, “Will cannabis, used medicinally, benefit my pet in the same way it would benefit me?”

Here is what we know:

Is cannabis safe for pets?

Yes, but first of all, most people aren’t blowing smoke in their dog’s face. Rather, they are consuming cannabis in other forms. A common way is a specialized whole plant extract, or RSO. Importantly, RSO is often packed with CBDs, the substance that provides therapeutic effects. Just remember, a little goes a long way. We recommend a dose the size of a grain of rice.

Will my pet feel relief immediately?

Just like us, your pet may experience near immediate relief from pain and anxiety. However, some ailments may take more time to see results, like inflammation.

Will my pet get high?

CBDs, like in humans, do not result in the classically “high” effects. Instead, your pet will receive the medicinal benefits of cannabis, but won’t get high like we know it as this is the non-psychoactive substance in cannabis.

People have noticed that their pet gets drowsy, and on rare occasions excessive itchiness and mild vomiting have been reported. However, even these more mild symptoms are more the outlier than the rule.

With that said, while mild sleepiness is ok, if your dog experiences any negative reactions, immediately discontinue use.

Note: Since the legalization of cannabis, poison control centers are reporting an increase of calls asking what to do because their pet ate a their nugs. Cannabis, when dispensed correctly, is beneficial for your pets, but eating a bunch of your loose weed is not.

If your dog’s side effects include severe lethargy, dilated pupils, excessive drooling, being off balance, muscle twitching, excessive vomiting, involuntary urination, or even unconsciousness, immediately take your dog to the vet.

Why do people turn to cannabis?

While cancer and arthritis are the most common symptoms cannabis is used to treat, anxiety is high on the list of reasons people want to try this alternative option on their pets. Some breeds, and many mixed breeds – specifically rescue dogs – experience tremendous anxiety. This Velcro-dog will be totally chill when its owner is around, but completely freak, destroy the house, and not stop whining when left alone.

It’s a terrible position for a new dog owner to be in, especially for those who live in an apartment complex or any other close quarters where neighbors can hear the ruckus.

While there are dog anxiety vests, like the ThunderShirt, that are effective, but not enough, and medications prescribed by the vet that will make your dog so hazy they rebel the pill, cannabis has become a turn-to option.

It works on humans, so why not our canine buds?

Why didn’t my vet react positively to this question?

Each pet, like each person, is different, so there may be a specific reasons your vet does not want your animal to consume cannabis. However, a common reason vets ignore or deflate the topic is because cannabis is not legal in many places. It’s still illegal on a federal level, it’s illegal in most states at a recreational level, and it’s only medicinally recognized in about half of the states at this point.

If you think cannabis is right for your pet, do your own research and, if legal, experiment with a little to see how your pet reacts. If you like the effect, great! If not, or you think it unwise in your specific situation, we respect that opinion. You do you!

What’s the counter argument?

The American Veterinary Medical Association is staying away from support for the moment, while individual veterinarians are showing increasing support. With that said, even those who recognize that cannabis could benefit pets, want more scientific support.

In an AVMA blog post, one pro-cannabis vet, Dr. Douglas Kramer – specifically for the treatment of postoperative and chronic pain – said, “My position is the same as the AMA’s. We need to investigate marijuana further to determine whether the case reports I’m hearing are true or whether there’s a placebo effect at work. We also need to know what the risks are.”

Another more questioning vet, Dr. Dawn Boothe, followed with, “My gut reaction is they do probably provide some therapeutic effect benefit . . . but, I’m never going to say there’s enough benefit that marijuana should be given to pets. I’m saying there’s enough justification that we need to study it.”

So, what should I give my pet if I want to try cannabis?

There are numerous companies that produce cannabis products specifically for pets. Canna-Pet offers CBD-filled capsules for cats and dogs, as well as hemp doggy biscuits.

Similarly, Canna Companion also provides capsules that were developed by Washington State licensed veterinarians. These capsules are all natural, non-GMO, and do not contain wheat, corn, sugar, or soy.

Is cannabis right for your pet?

What’s the Right Smoke Method For You

pre-rolled joints in a circle

If you’re reading this, chances are you partake in cannabis. Whether you prefer joints, pipes, bongs, or vaporizers, imbibing cannabis is a way of life for many of us. If you’re like me, you’re concerned with three main things; taste, smoothness, and most importantly, how high you get. We all know that these are largely dependent on the type of bud you smoke, however the method with which you consume can play just as big a role. It may surprise you to know that just by switching up how you smoke, one can significantly alter how high they get and how much bud they use to get there.

THC absorption graph methods

Most stoners will have at least one pipe in their glass collection, whereas some of us prefer the simplicity of a joint. Both methods are practical, quick, and easy, each imparting a unique taste and consistency of smoke. However, there are also certain drawbacks to these methods. Joints, if rolled improperly, can run, whereas pipes can have a tendency to be harsh. Ultimately however, the reason that I prefer other methods comes down to how high I get. When smoked in a joint, your body is only capable of absorbing between 5% and 30% of the available THC in the plant. A pipe isn’t much better at 20-40%. This discrepancy is due to destruction of THC via pyrolysis (loss by fire), loss due to sidestream smoke (the smoke which escapes when not inhaling), and additional chemicals produced by the combustion process interfering in your lung’s capacity to absorb THC.

As a step up from these more basic inhalation methods, many stoners use bongs or bubblers. Bongs filter the smoke through water, making the smoke that enters the lungs much smoother due to the removal of a large amount of the water soluble, non-cannabinoid components. This filtration combined with the reduction of sidestream smoke allow the body to absorb between 50-70% of the available THC. It goes without saying that by using a water piece, one can potentially get more out of their weed, making them a more cost effective method. Bongs and Bubblers are not without their own drawbacks however, bongs can be bulky, and bubblers don’t provide the same level of filtration and require more frequent water changes. In addition, anybody who has accidentally sucked up old bong water will agree, you cannot create a fouler substance without using nuclear material.

Finally, we have come to vaporizers. Without a doubt, vaporization is the smoothest, most efficient, and cost effective method for consuming cannabis. On many models there are different temperature settings, some even allowing you to adjust by the single degree. This variability allows one to properly volatilize nearly all of the THC within the plant, between 75-98%. In addition to squeezing nearly every metaphorical drop out of your bud, one can also achieve volatilization of nearly all of the terpenes without actually combusting them. Not only does this lead to the best possible flavor from your weed, it also improves your experience due to the interaction of these terpenes with the THC in your bloodstream. As you could imagine, a vaporizer will allow your weed to go the furthest, saving you money in the long run. In this writer’s opinion, the only drawbacks to this method are the upfront cost of the unit itself, and the fact that you simply can’t get a vape to look as pretty as well worked glass.

To put all of this in perspective, all methods of cannabis consumption have their positives and negatives. There isn’t much that beats a well rolled joint on a bright summer day, and a pipe for your bag is an essential for every stoner on the go. A fat bong rip will get you to where you want to be without scorching your lungs, using less weed in the process, and vaporizers will make you salivate from the intense flavor. Ultimately however, whether you puff a pipe, rip a bong, or sip on a vape, the most important things are that you find something that you love, you smoke responsibly, and that you stay high and happy!

-Budtender Andrew

The Benefits & Cautions When Cooking With Cannabis

benefits cooking cannabis

Cooking with cannabis is a great alternative to those who do not want to smoke it, those with medical conditions, or those just looking to experience a different type of high.

 

While you used to be limited to just edibles, today there are numerous recipes available so you can combine your favorite cannabis strain and delicious meal for the perfect, delectable weekend or afternoon treat. Or, you can mix cannabis cooking oils into literally anything you consume to make your favorite snack even more enjoyable.

However, just like when you consume edibles, there are benefits and precautions to consider when cooking with cannabis. Most notably, there is a delayed reaction compared to the rather immediate psychoactive effect associated with inhalation. No matter what product you decide to pick up during your next trip to your local dispensary in Vancouver, Washington, here are some benefits and cautions to consider next time you cook with cannabis.

The Decarboxylation Process
One of the first things to understand when cooking with cannabis is a process known as decarboxylation. This is a fancy scientific word that simply explains the chemical heating reaction of removing a carboxyl group and releasing carbon dioxide. More specifically, it’s the process by which THCA is converted to THC.

THC (tetrahydrocannabinol), as you might know, is one of the two main active molecules in cannabis and provides the euphoric heady high we all known and love. But, what is THCA? This is the non-psychoactive cannabinoid found in raw, live cannabis plants. So, how do you achieve this transformation?

Well, the process occurs naturally when cannabis dries, but we don’t want to wait forever, so we speed the process up by adding heat. While this process happens naturally when smoking or vaping, it’s an extra step to take if you want to combine your favorite sativa and baked good rather than opting for cannabis-infused butters or cooking oils. However, you don’t want to heat it up too much. This will prematurely release THC instead of just activating it. So, cook below its boiling point — absolutely no higher than 314 degrees Fahrenheit. Here are the results of one person experimenting at 240 degrees Fahrenheit between 30 and 60 minutes in the oven.

Cooking Basics
There are a number of tidbits that people who cook with cannabis are ready to dole out, but a top tip is to cook with fat (oil, butter, milk). While you may have an inclination to throw together a healthy fare, since THC is extremely fat-soluble, this is necessary for proper absorption after consumption. Unlike water-soluble molecules that are able to easily pass through to your body for excretion, fat-soluble molecules pass through the intestinal tract into your bloodstream. Once THC enters your blood it then moves to your central and peripheral nervous systems to cause its sensual and psychoactive effects.

Consider Your Measurements

Just like you wouldn’t throw together a cake without measuring the baking soda and sugar, you won’t want to just throw cannabis-infused butter into your meal without considering the desired effects.

 

First, if you purchased pre-made cannabis butter, look at the THC concentration on your product. Note that regardless of what’s listed as, it’s in our recommendation to use just a small amount the first time. If you receive your desired effect, excellent! If you want a more potent high, add some more next time. In my personal opinion, after at least one instance of being couch ridden for the rest of the day, it’s better to add too little than too much, especially if you’re new to cannabis cooking.

Think About Flavor

If you plan to dry your cannabis purchased at the nearby dispensary in Vancouver, Washington, and use that for cooking, go with what you know and choose something yummy. To no surprise, cannabis will alter the flavor of whatever you cook. If you choose skunk weed, you’re not likely to enjoy your edible as much as if you chose your favorite, fruity strain and add it into your pancakes. Now that sounds like a delicious Saturday morning breakfast!

Bake Beyond Brownies

As just mentioned, don’t limit yourself to the run-of-the-mill weed brownies. Sure, they’ll be delicious, but you can really add cannabis to anything, so get creative. Make a crock-pot dinner and throw it in there, sauté up some vegetables and add some there, too. There are few restrictions, so have fun. Just remember, as said before, make sure you include the fat! I think my next experiment will be with cannabis-infused granola bars to take on my next trek into the Portland forests. What about you?

The Effects

So, what are the effects? Well, it does vary, but regardless of whether you choose a sativa or indica-based cooking adventure, the effect

1) takes longer to occur

2) lasts longer

3) is a more physical high

Are you excited to get started on your edibles journey? It’s a totally new adventure to jump into the world of cooking with cannabis. No longer are you limited to inhalation and pre-prepared cannabis-infused chocolates stuffed with added sugars. You now control your cannabis consumption. You can find the perfect flavor profile and marijuana measurement to create the optimal desired effects. Now, go forth and experiment.

But, if you take away only a few tips remember to (a) cook with fat and (b) start small.

If you have any questions on how to get started on your cannabis cooking journey, want to swap recipes, or are looking for cannabis-infused cooking oils, visit our dispensary in Vancouver, Washington where our bud-tenders are ready to share their extensive scientific and personal knowledge on the topic.

You Can Fly With Cannabis, Sort of

flying travel with cannabis

“Can I fly on a plane with my cannabis that I legally purchased?” This is a question we hear on a pretty regular basis. The answer, unfortunately, is a complicated one. But, let’s try to break it down anyway.

First, let’s assume that since you’re purchasing your cannabis at Mary Jane’s House of Grass, our Vancouver Washington dispensary, that you’ll probably be flying out of Portland International Airport, just across the river.

Then, let’s next imagine that you’re just taking a short hop over to Eugene and will be landing at Eugene Airport, also known as Mahlon Sweet Field, without leaving the state. Then, based on state regulations, you would legally be allowed to carry up to an ounce of cannabis on your commercial flight. Airport officials changed its policy after the statewide recreational cannabis law went into effect.

With that said, you better be flying within the state.

If you are flying to literally anywhere else and have to cross state lines, then you might just be in trouble.

That’s because, if the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) at Portland International Airport finds that you are carrying cannabis, their first action is to report you to the Port Police.

What, I thought you said I could fly with cannabis?

Yes, you can fly with cannabis within the state of Oregon and if you are 21 years old and if you have one ounce or less. According to an article in Travel + Leisure, “[TSA agents] ‘do not search for marijuana and other drugs’ but will refer any that are found to local law enforcement.

So, if you carry your ounce of weed through the security checkpoint in your carry-on bag and a TSA agent finds it, you have to deal with Port Police.

What happens next?

First, you’ll probably have to wait a long time and you might even miss your flight. They’re not interested in your travel plans. They’re just doing their job and usually that takes awhile.

But seriously, Port Police will then check to see how old you are (confirming you are above 21 years of age), check to see if you are carrying within the legal limit (one ounce), and check your final destination, which must be within state. If those boxes are checked off, then you are free to go . . . find the next flight available because you just missed yours.

 

What if I’m carrying an ounce or less, but try to take it on an out-of-state flight?

Well, you’re in luck, kind of. Since cannabis is legal in the state of Oregon, the Port Police will most likely just make you ditch your stash before your flight rather than prosecute you.

As Steve Johnson, media relations manager for the Port of Portland, told Travel + Leisure, “most commonly the traveler will be asked to leave the secured area . . . and safely secure the recreational marijuana before traveling.”

You just got so lucky! Traveling with cannabis across state lines is a federal crime.

What  if I’m traveling through another airport in a state where cannabis is legal?

Well, it varies. The laws in Washington are very similar to Oregon, so if you’re flying out of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport you’re cannabis will only be confiscated if you’ve committed a violation of the law. So, like Oregon, the charge is based on fact rather than a premeditated act.

However, the rules change if you’re in Colorado. You can’t even bring cannabis anywhere on the Denver International property. It is banned. And, in Colorado Springs, amnesty boxes have been set up so anyone who “accidentally” brought cannabis with them to the airport can safely deposit it before boarding a flight.

But, what if I’m flying from Oregon to another state where cannabis is recreationally legal?

Unfortunately, it’s still technically a no-no and the reason is multifaceted.

For one, transporting cannabis across state lines is illegal as it’s considered interstate transport by the federal government. This could involve jail time, according to an article in Weed News.

However, you might ask, “What’s the deal? If I’m traveling from one legal cannabis state to another; this should not be an issue.” Nope, it shouldn’t, but it is. Again, the reasons are multifaceted, but let’s start with the fact that states who have legalized recreational cannabis added a byline that prohibited purchasers from leaving the state where the cannabis was legally obtained.

More importantly, the air where planes travel is mostly made up of federal air space. And, if you don’t recall, cannabis, while legal at the state level, is illegal at the federal level. So, even if you legally fly with cannabis from Portland to Eugene, if you fly into federal air space, you are breaking the law.

So you’re telling me it’s a bad idea?

Not so fast, buddy. It’s definitely not worth the hassle if you get caught, but not that many people even get caught – or maybe not that many people are taking the risk? Nope, I think not that many people are getting caught.

According to data from Denver International Airport, 55 million people traveled through this hub in 2015 and not a single person received a ticket related to cannabis possession. And, more astoundingly, only 30 people were stopped by TSA and were asked to toss their cannabis; they did.

And honestly, I’d be more concerned about the people trying to bring loaded guns in carry-on bags. Not the friends wanting to get high on vacation.

In the same 2015 timespan, TSA saw over 708 million passengers in the U.S. and scanned 1.6 billion carry-on bags at which time they discover 2,653 guns, 83% of which were loaded. That was a 20% increase from 2014.

Ultimately, TSA is concerned with actual security threats, not your one-ounce cannabis. So, do what you will, but know that if you’re within the legal carry limits, you’re more likely to miss your flight than end up with a ticket, or worse, in jail. So, stop by our Vancouver Washington dispensary and just try to smoke all the cannabis before your next flight.

Cannabis and Alcohol: How They Mix

effects smoking cannabis drinking alcohol

Imagine, you’ve just returned home on a Friday evening after a long week of work. All you want to do is just chill out and clear your head of the stresses you encountered. Sometimes you grab for a nice cold beer, but today you opt to smoke some cannabis that you picked up at a nearby dispensary in Vancouver.

You take a long, deep inhale and near immediately feel a wave of calm come over you. You slink a little deeper into the couch and turn on your favorite go-to show on Netflix. It’s early so you opted for a hybrid strain because, hey, maybe someone will call with plans. In the meantime, it’s just you laughing to the lines you’ve laughed at a million times before and emptying your head of those flood of work worries you couldn’t let go just moments before.

Twenty minutes pass when your friends start texting you. They’re meeting up at the local bar and you want you to join, especially because it’s within walking distance. It’s early so you decide to take them up on their offer.

You arrive at the bar, still high, and down a few craft brews. A few hours later you’re feeling pretty good and decide to take a leisurely walk home. You arrive a few minutes later, flop back down on the couch and take another drag of your bong, as there was still a little cannabis left over.

This is a scene that plays out all over the country on any given night. Both cannabis and alcohol were legally and safely consumed and the desired effect was achieved.

But, what was the actual effect on the body? Did smoking cannabis and drinking alcohol, often referred to as “cross fading” when consumed together, have a different effect than just one or the other?

Let’s explore this more.

In the example provided, the person safely consumed cannabis and alcohol. This is usually the case. But, after researchers found that they are the two most common drug combinations detected in car accidents, they decided to dig into the impact on the body.

This research, first featured in Clinical Chemistry, the journal of the American Association for Clinical Chemistry, officially confirmed that when a person simultaneously consumes alcohol and cannabis their blood contains a higher concentration of cannabis’ main psychoactive property, tetrahydrocannabinol, better known to you as THC.

Their research confirms that if you are smoking cannabis with THC, you will feel more “high” if you are also drinking alcohol, maximizing the effect of the cannabis comparatively to consuming cannabis alone.

So, how did they figure this out?

Scientists asked 32 adult cannabis smokers to drink either placebo or low-dose alcohol 10 minutes before inhaling 500 mg placebo, low-dose THC, or high-dose TCV vaporized cannabis. Their blood and plasma were then collected and measured.

Of the 19 participants who completed the study, each had “significantly” higher blood THC values with alcohol use.

What else do we know?

We know that each person reacts differently, regardless of what the studies show thus far, as confirmed by Scott Lukas, a psychiatry and pharmacology professor at Harvard Medical School who’s performed multiple cross fading experiments.

“Not everyone responds to alcohol and marijuana the same,” Lukas told Vice News, but added that THC levels now commonly found in cannabis exceed the amount used in his studies.

What are other possible side effects?

When you use alcohol and marijuana at the same time the likelihood of you greening out goes up considerable. This refers to someone feeling ill after smoking marijuana.

When a person is greening out they might feel sweaty and nauseated while looking pale and complaining of feeling dizzy with the spins. He or she may even vomit. This often follows the desire to lie down for a nap.

Greening out is not a common side effect of cannabis, but drinking alcohol beforehand does increase the chances. However, when someone smokes before drinking, this effect is unlikely to occur.

Just like the phrase, liquor before beer, you’re in the clear; it turns out the same holds true for cannabis.

While greening out isn’t life threatening, alcohol poisoning, on the other hand, is.

It is known that cannabis has an antiemetic effect, meaning it makes it more difficult for the body to vomit and stunts nausea. While this is an excellent effect for those who are prescribed harsh cancer medications, it is not a side effect you want to experience if you accidentally overdo it on the alcohol while smoking. In this case, the side effect could be dangerous as vomiting is the body’s way of emitting harmful substances from the body – expelling excess alcohol.

With that said, even Lukas agrees the risks are low.

“If you’re sitting alone in your bedroom,” he said, “and you’ve got pillows all around you, and you’re well hydrated, and the bed’s not too far off the ground, the risk is low.”

What We Don’t Know

Unfortunately, while a lot is know about the effects of alcohol on the body, as well as the effects of cannabis on the body, not much is known about the combined effect they can have on your system.

According to a study from Northeastern University, some partakers interviewed had the time of their lives. Others, on the flip side, felt immensely ill, vomited, and then passed out.

Ultimately, when these two substances are used together the likelihood of something going wrong increases. So, if you decide to experiment, do so vigilantly and around people you trust in a safe environment.

And, when you’re ready to snag some more cannabis for your next high, come visit our dispensary in Vancouver, Mary Jane’s House of Grass. We’ve got the hookup for all your cannabis needs.